Kids' minds get 'clouded' by UNT Sky Theater shows

Tuesday, June 3, 2014 - 14:36

What: The University of North Texas Sky Theater is featuring three matinee shows to teach children about the world from the ground up. See which matinee is currently being shown here or view the schedule below.

When: Noon on Saturdays. Shows are year-round, but only the summer schedule is set.

Where: UNT Sky Theater at the Environmental Education, Science and Technology Building, 1704 W. Mulberry St., Denton

Cost: $3 for all ages. Parking is free on Saturdays in Lot 11, west of the Environmental Education, Science and Technology Building.

Contact: 940-369-8213

DENTON, Texas (UNT) – Nearly everyone knows that March winds and April showers bring May flowers, but how do weather and the sky above change our world? Young children can discover the reasons for the seasons in the kickoff show for this summer's matinees at the University of North Texas Sky Theater, which displays large, HD projections to create engaging films inside a 100-seat, 40-foot domed theater.

Each Saturday, the UNT planetarium will feature animated adventures that help children discover everything from the nighttime stars to the earth beneath their feet. Shows start at noon and last roughly one hour.

See which of the three matinees is currently being shown by clicking here, or view the schedule below.

"The kids love the shows and the information that they learn sticks," said Randall Peters, planetarium manager. He noted the shows are known to attract child "regulars" who return for every showing of their favorite films. "They're so excited when they come back that they cannot stop talking about everything they learned the last time."

The animations change each month and are generally geared toward specific age groups. Private shows for parties are available upon request; see details at http://skytheater.unt.edu/reservations.html.

The summer schedule:

  • In "The Seasons Reasons Show" (2nd grade – shown Saturdays in June), Marvin Short, Jake Jupiter and Laura Twist teach kids why we have seasons by breaking down the ins and outs of weather, the water cycle, clouds, constellations and the moon. The characters' voices are narrated by talent from the TV cartoon series "Dragonball Z."
  • In "Solar Systems Tours" (3rd grade – shown Saturdays in July), kids get to see close-up views of the planets. Flying from the Earth's sun to the edge of the solar system, children will be guided through the most interesting aspects of our orbit, including the reclassification of Pluto.
  • In "Flight Adventures" (3rd grade – shown Saturdays in August), a girl and her grandfather explore the beauties of flight through everything from birds to kites to planes, while also learning about the future of flying and traveling in the sky.

UNT News Service Phone Number: (940) 565-2108

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