UNT’s Texas Fashion Collection presents exhibition of kimonos at NorthPark Center

The exhibition “Reimagining the Kimono,” presented by the Texas Fashion Collecti
The exhibition “Reimagining the Kimono,” presented by the Texas Fashion Collection of the University of North Texas, will feature a uchikake, a formal outer kimono by an unknown designer. The exhibition runs from May 1 (Monday) to June 27 (Tuesday) at NorthPark Center.
The exhibition “Reimagining the Kimono,” presented by the Texas Fashion Collecti
The exhibition “Reimagining the Kimono,” presented by the Texas Fashion Collection of the University of North Texas, will feature a chiffon gown with Japanese symbols, including Mt. Fuji, by designer Hanae Mori. The exhibition runs from May 1 (Monday) to June 27 (Tuesday) at NorthPark Center.
The exhibition “Reimagining the Kimono,” presented by the Texas Fashion Collecti
The exhibition “Reimagining the Kimono,” presented by the Texas Fashion Collection of the University of North Texas, will feature gowns from cross-cultural perspectives, such as Duro Olowu’s robe. The exhibition runs from May 1 (Monday) to June 27 (Tuesday) at NorthPark Center.
Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 11:15

What: “Reimagining the Kimono,” an exhibition featuring 13 kimonos from the Texas Fashion Collection at the University of North Texas.

When: May 1 (Monday) to June 27 (Tuesday).

Where: NorthPark Center, 8687 North Central Expressway, Dallas.

DENTON (UNT), Texas -- One of the most iconic garments in the world – the kimono – gets its own exhibition from the Texas Fashion Collection of the University of North Texas.

“Reimagining the Kimono” will run from May 1 to June 27 at NorthPark Center in Dallas. The collection will feature 13 kimono and kimono-inspired garments from both Japanese and non-Japanese designers.

The garment began as everyday wear in Japan, but as the country opened trade with the U.S. and Europe in the 1800s, women wore it exclusively for special occasions or weddings.

The exhibition will feature two uchikake, formal outer kimonos with elaborate decoration; chiffon gowns by Hanae Mori, who made evening wear with traditional Japanese symbols, such as Mt. Fuji and cherry blossoms; and gowns from African, American and European perspectives, such as Duro Olowu’s kimono dress that incorporates prints inspired by his native Nigeria.

Annette Becker, curator for the Texas Fashion Collection, noted the kimono has influenced numerous designers, including Oscar de la Renta, who adopted its “T” shape and added his own elements.

“This cross-cultural exploration illustrates ways of being inspired by but still respectful of traditional design,” Becker said.

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