One O’Clock Lab Band to perform with critically acclaimed jazz saxophonist

Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 15:24
The University of North Texas College of Music’s One O’Clock Lab Band is excited to welcome critically acclaimed jazz saxophonist Jimmy Heath.
The University of North Texas College of Music’s One O’Clock Lab Band is excited to welcome critically acclaimed jazz saxophonist Jimmy Heath.

What: UNT One O’Clock Lab Band directed by Alan Baylock, will perform with guest artist Jimmy Heath.

When: 8 p.m. March 1 (Thursday)

Where: Margot and Bill Winspear Performance Hall in the Murchison Performing Arts Center, 2100 Interstate 35E, Denton.

Cost: $15 for the public; $10 for UNT faculty, staff and Alumni Association members; free for UNT students. Students can pick up their free ticket at the Murchison Performing Arts Center box office. UNT faculty, staff, alumni and the public, may purchase their tickets at the Murchison Performing Arts Center online or by calling the box office at 940-369-7802.

DENTON (UNT), Texas — The University of North Texas College of Music’s One O’Clock Lab Band is excited to welcome critically acclaimed jazz saxophonist Jimmy Heath. The performance is at 8 p.m. March 1 (Thursday) in Margot and Bill Winspear Performance Hall in the Murchison Performing Arts Center, 2100 Interstate 35E in Denton.

"Jimmy Heath will provide our students with a unique perspective on playing jazz and the history of the music," said John Murphy, chair of the Division of Jazz Studies. "His career as a saxophonist dates back to the 1940s. He played with Charlie Parker. He spoke about his friendship with John Coltrane in the 2016 documentary ‘Chasing Trane.’ He's also a prolific composer and a veteran educator. At the concert, he'll be featured in a small group with members of the jazz faculty during the first half and with the One O'Clock Lab Band in the second half of the program, which will include his compositions."

The band is directed by associate professor of jazz, Alan Baylock.

“Jimmy Heath is a living legend,” Baylock said. “There are few people in the history of jazz who have had such a long and fruitful career.”