UNT engineering school receives $5,000 to make Texas a cooler place

Friday, April 23, 2004

DENTON (UNT), Texas — As another long hot Texas summer approaches, engineering students from the University of North Texas are learning how to improve the efficiency of air conditioners. During the course of their work, they’ll also learn how to keep homes warmer in the winter.The American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers recently awarded the UNT student chapter of ASHRAE with a $5,000 grant.The annual grant is given to universities to fund engineering projects for students to build something that will help them and others in gaining practical and classroom knowledge.“Last year, our students were awarded a grant to build a heat exchanger analyzer,” said Seifollah Nasrazadani, UNT associate professor of engineering technology. “The students produced a device that the UNT College of Engineering will be able to use for teaching for several years.”Nasrazadani said that these type of grants help create a foundation to establish a thermal science laboratory.ASHRAE is an international organization of 55,000 persons. Its sole objective is to advance through research, standards writing, publishing and continuing education the arts and sciences of heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration to serve the evolving needs of the public.For more information about UNT’s engineering technology department or the UNT ASHRAE student chapter, contact Nasrazadani at (940) 565-4052.

UNT News Service Phone Number: (940) 565-2108

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