UNT dance concert features faculty's original choreography

Friday, April 20, 2012

What: Moving Stories Past and Present: Faculty Dance Concert 2012, presented by the University of North Texas Department of Dance and Theatre. The performance will feature 36 dance students in five dances choreographed by UNT dance faculty.

When: 8 p.m. April 26 (Thursday), 27 (Friday), 28 (Saturday) and 2 p.m. April 29 (Sunday)

Where: University Theatre in the Radio, Television, Film and Performing Arts Building at UNT, located one block west of Welch and Chestnut streets at 1179 Union Circle Dr..

Cost: $7.50 for UNT students, faculty, staff and seniors, $10 for adults.

Contact: Amanda Breaz, UNT box office promotions and manager, 940-565-2428 amanda.breaz@unt.edu

DENTON (UNT), Texas -- The University of North Texas Department of Dance and Theatre will present Moving Stories Past and Present: Faculty Dance Concert 2012 April 26-29 (Thursday-Sunday). The production will include five dances performed by 36 UNT dance students, including a reconstructed version of Rooms by the late renowned contemporary choreographer Anna Sokolow staged by Yunyu Wang, who was an artist in residence in January 2012.

The dances choreographed by UNT  faculty members include Endorphin Groove, choreographed by Mary Lynn Babcock; Bonds by Teresa Cooper;, TAE by guest artist Kihyoung Choi and Twitterpated by Shelley Cushman.

During her January residency at UNT, Wang reconstructed Rooms for dance students to perform at the Faculty Dance concert production. Composer Kenyon Hopkins provided an original jazz scoring backdrop for the dance, an intimate exposure of loneliness and isolation in New York City. TAE, a Korean contemporary piece choreographed by Choi, will be a display of distinct traditional movements to the sound of Korean drums and beats. The dancers in this cultural display tell the story of the boundless cycles of life through fluid and graceful modern fusion dances.

Twitterpatted, choreographed by Cushman, evokes the exhilaration of first falling in love, taking its title from a word used in the Disney movie Bambi. Cushman said she was inspired to create the 1920s musical scenery of the piece from her grandmother, who was born during that decade.  Babcock's Endorphin Groove will kick up the pace with high-energy movement from a large ensemble of dancers transmitting the feeling of euphoric highs and the intensity of endorphin rushes. Bonds, from Cooper, explores the highs and lows of relationships and the fulfillment of the long-lasting connections between two people. ides an original jazz scoring backdrp[

For more information, contact Amanda Breaz at 940-565-2428 or amanda.breaz@unt.edu.

UNT News Service Phone Number: (940) 565-2108

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