Speech, mock car crash to show dangers of drunken driving

Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - 11:50

What: Look Both Ways: An Insight into Drinking and Driving -- The University of North Texas Student Government Association presents an alcohol awareness speech by CAMPUSPEAK's Mark Sterner and a dramatization of a drunken driving accident

When: Speech at 7 p.m. Feb. 27 (Thursday), followed by simulated drunken driving accident

Where: Speech in Coliseum, 600 Avenue D, UNT campus; simulated drunken driving accident outside the Coliseum on North Texas Boulevard

Cost: Free

Contact: Matthew Varnell, director of public relations for Student Government Association, at matthew.varnell@unt.edu

Media: Download a press photo of Sterner. Photography is allowed during Sterner's speech. No audio or video recording of Sterner's speech is allowed.

DENTON (UNT), Texas -- Guest speaker Mark Sterner will tell University of North Texas students how his life changed after a drunken driving accident that left three of his friends dead.

And UNT students will see for themselves the dangers of drunken driving, as a realistic dramatization of an accident will unfold on UNT's North Texas Boulevard immediately following the speech.

Sterner's speech starts at 7 p.m. Feb. 27 (Thursday) in the Coliseum, 600 Avenue D, on the UNT campus. While on a spring break trip with his fraternity brothers in college, they decided the least drunk person would drive home. Sterner, who took the wheel that night, ended up in the hospital and went to prison for his role in the accident. He has told his story to more than 2 million students across the country.

A simulated car accident will begin about one hour after the speech. Two wrecked cars will be staged on North Texas Boulevard. Police officers, an ambulance and fire truck will arrive on the scene as students portraying the accident victims emerge from the cars. One will be transported by helicopter ambulance to a local hospital. Only three of the five mock accident victims will survive.

"This event is being presented in an effort to remind students – and everyone -- of the dangers of drunken driving," said Matt Varnell, director of public relations for the Student Government Association. "While this accident scene is just a dramatization, this will be an emotional experience for many people, and we will have UNT counselors on hand to help people deal with the feelings this brings up. We hope that people who see this simulated accident will realize their actions could impact people for the rest of their lives."

The event is sponsored by UNT Student Government Association, UNT Greek Life, UNT University Program Council, UNT Housing, UNT Division of Student Affairs and UNT Police Department.

UNT News Service Phone Number: (940) 565-2108

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