Recycling leads to high fashion for UNT students

Thursday, January 18, 2007

Ever wonder what to do with your old clothes? What about making them into other clothes, following the lead of some University of North Texas fashion design students?

The students, all seniors, created one-of-a-kind garments out of recycled clothes, guitar picks and other odds and ends. The nouveau creations will be on display this month on the UNT campus in the the University Union Gallery. The free exhibition is sponsored by the Fashion and Design Society, a student group of UNT.

Student Jennifer Wilson used guitar picks to trim the top and skirt that she created out of old clothes. She made a matching pair of earrings and a bracelet of guitar picks, too.

Student Dandi Rosson encased knickknacks a wristband, earrings and loose change in bubble wrap to design a coat out of the remnants of an older garment.

Victoria Bleakley, president of the Fashion and Design Society at UNT, said that in creating her garment, she learned skills she can take with her to New York as she pursues a fashion design or patternmaking career.

"The best part was to take things we normally use and see it as a canvas," she said. "It was like sculpting with clothes."

UNT News Service Phone Number: (940) 565-2108

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