Race and gender in the West topic of Women's History Month lecture

Dr. Sarah J. Deutsch
Dr. Sarah J. Deutsch, dean of social sciences at Duke University.
Thursday, February 28, 2008

What: "Dreams of Inclusion: Re-narrating Race and Gender in the History of the U.S. West" -- A lecture at the University of North Texas by Dr. Sarah J. Deutsch, dean of social sciences at Duke University. Part of UNT's observance of Women's History Month in March.

When: March 6 (Thursday), 4 p.m.

Where: Lyceum of UNT's University Union, which is located one block west of Welch and West Prairie streets, UNT campus

Cost: Free

Contact: UNT Department of History, (940) 565-3197

DENTON (UNT), Texas -- Dr. Sarah J. Deutsch, dean of social sciences in Duke University's Division of Arts and Sciences, will discuss the intersection of class, culture and gender in the American Southwest during a free lecture at the University of North Texas March 6 (Thursday).

"Dreams of Inclusion: Re-narrating Race and Gender in the History of the U.S. West" begins at 4 p.m. in the Lyceum of UNT's University Union, which is located one block west of Welch and West Prairie streets. Sponsored by the UNT Department of History and the Women's Studies program, the lecture is part of UNT's observance of Women's History Month in March.

Deutsch, whose research focuses on U.S. history from 1870 to 1940, said she will discuss the importance of the mythic history of the frontier to how Americans think of themselves, pointing out that classic frontier stories focusing on the triumph of individuals over adversity carry implications that are less than egalitarian for women and members of racial minorities.

"These stories are appealing to many people, including to women and people of color. I'm also exploring other types of stories that reframe our mythic west," she said.

Deutsch is the author of "No Separate Refuge: Culture, Class, and Gender on an Anglo-Hispanic Frontier in the American Southwest, 1880-1940." In the book, she argues against long-held beliefs that Hispanic women were obedient and essentially invisible at that time, noting that by taking the roles of household leader and provider in the absence of migrating male wage earners, the women were pivotal in maintaining social cohesiveness in their villages, thus helping to retain a Hispanic cultural identity.

Deutsch received several awards for "No Separate Refuge," including Yale University's Bourne Medal, which is awarded every three years for distinguished scholarship by a young historian. She is also the author of "Women and the City: Gender, Space and Power in Boston, 1870-1940."

A Duke faculty member since 2004, Deutsch has also taught at the University of Arizona, where she was named the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences Most Distinguished Teacher in Lower Division Undergraduate Courses; Clark University in Worcester, Mass., where she was named Outstanding Teacher for 1995 by the graduating class; New York University; Yale University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is an Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer.

She received her bachelor's and doctoral degrees from Yale University and her master's degree from Oxford University, where she studied on a Rhodes Scholarship.

UNT News Service Phone Number: (940) 565-2108

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