New MBA graduates can expect more job choices, higher salaries than 2005 graduates

Thursday, April 6, 2006
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Graduation is fast approaching for students of Master of Business Administration programs nationwide -- and they won't be hurting for money on their first jobs.

A new survey conducted by the Graduate Management Admissions Council shows that second-year MBA students can expect an average base starting salary of nearly $81,000 this year, compared to around $78,000 in 2005.

Kathleen Cooper, dean of the University of North Texas College Of Business Administration, is cheering the news that this year's graduating MBA students will have more jobs available to them and higher salaries compared to the class of 2005. Thirty-three UNT students, including 13 majoring in finance, eight majoring in accounting and eight majoring in marketing, are graduating with MBAs this spring.

Cooper says the new MBA graduates "are reaping the benefits of a strong national economy and robust growth locally."

"With more new jobs being created, their options are considerably wider than a few years ago and their starting salaries are on the move as well," she says.

The same study shows that recruiters plan to hire 18 percent more MBA graduates this year than they did in 2005. Finance and marketing are the hottest job fields.

Derrick D'Souza, associate dean for graduate programs in UNT's College of Business Administration, says the university's MBA and other master's degree programs prepare students for successful careers in the corporate world. 

"Our marketing and logistics program has a reputation for providing graduates with a strong, application-oriented foundation," he says.

Recruiters who participated in the Graduate Management Admissions Council study say they're particularly eager to find MBAs whose "soft" skills -- such as leadership potential and communication expertise -- are strong. Nearly four out of 10 recruiters say they place significant weight on soft skills when judging people they interview.

D'Souza says UNT's Professional Leadership Program, which is now in its tenth year, was designed to meet this need. The program, he says, takes students "from a backpack to a briefcase with poise and polish."

"It has established a reputation for delivering on its promise. PLP is open to all students and gives self starters and self motivators something that sets them apart from other job-seeking graduates," he says.

UNT News Service Phone Number: (940) 565-2108