Invisible Children presents documentary screening at UNT

Tony
Volunteers from Invisible Children will visit UNT on Sept. 22 (Thursday) to screen their newest documentary about humanitarian efforts in war-torn Uganda. Invisible Children is a non-profit organization created in 2003 after three filmmakers traveled to northern Uganda to make a documentary about kidnapped child soldiers. It has evolved into an international movement aimed at working with the Ugandan community to provide education, mentorships, the redevelopment of schools, resettlement from the camps and financial stability.
Monday, September 19, 2011

What: Invisible Children, non-profit organization promoting peace in central Africa, will screen its newest documentary, Tony.

When: 7-9 p.m. Sept. 22 (Thursday)

Where: Lyceum on the third floor of UNT's University Union, located one block west of Welch and West Prairie streets (1155 Union Circle)

Cost: Free and open to the public

Contact: Emily Worthington at eeworthington@gmail.com or visit the Invisible Children Club at UNT Facebook page

DENTON (UNT), Texas -- Volunteers from Invisible Children will come to UNT on Thursday as part of the Front Line tour throughout North America to show their newest documentary about humanitarian efforts in war-torn Uganda.

The event, presented by the Invisible Children Club at UNT, will be held at 7 p.m. Sept. 22 (Thursday) in the Lyceum on the third floor of UNT's University Union, located one block west of Welch and West Prairie streets (1155 Union Circle). The event is free and open to the public.

Invisible Children is a non-profit organization created in 2003 after three filmmakers traveled to northern Uganda to make a documentary about kidnapped child soldiers. It has evolved into an international movement aimed at working with the Ugandan community to provide education, mentorships, the redevelopment of schools, resettlement from the camps and financial stability.

"The newest film is about a Ugandan man named Tony, the story of his life and what he's overcome in central Africa," said Emily Worthington, promotions chair of the Invisible Children Club at UNT. "It's a bird's eye view of the situation occurring in areas affected by Lord's Resistance Army, and this film will help the UNT community to understand how intense the situation is and what we can do to help."

View the trailer online.

After the screening, Invisible Children volunteers, called roadies, will answer questions and play a personal message from Tony to UNT. Worthington says Tony became close with student organization members during Invisible Children's visit to UNT last October.

At 9 p.m., the Invisible Children Club at UNT will host an afterparty and donation drive on Fry Street to benefit Invisible Children's latest fundraising project called the Protection Plan. The project will fund FM radios, high frequency radio towers and a rehabilitation center in northern Uganda.

Donations can be made at the event and online.

For more information, contact and e-mail or visit the UNT Invisible Children Club Facebook page.

UNT News Service Phone Number: (940) 565-2108

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