Have your book and eat it too at university's Edible Book Festival

Moby Dick
UNT hosts annual Edible Book Festival
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UNT hosts annual Edible Book Festival
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UNT hosts annual Edible Book Festival
Thursday, March 23, 2006

Hungry for a good book?

Take a bite out of Joanne Harris' novel "Chocolat" -- creamy chocolates on a silver platter. Avoiding sweets? Perhaps the "Bread Sea Scrolls" would curb your appetite.

Books constructed from food will be on display from 2 to 4 p.m. April 3 in the Rare Book Room of the University of North Texas Willis Library during the university's annual Edible Book Festival.

Mary Durio, curator of the Rare Book and Texana Collections for the library, started the festival three years ago. She notes that some of the past entries were "clever and not very fun to eat," while others were "just delicious."

"One of my favorite ones was when someone had taken a big bowl and poured alphabet cereal into it. It was called ‘The Great American Novel (Some assembly required),'" she said.

Entries illustrate either the shape or content of a book and must be edible, although some non-edible parts are allowed if they can be removed before eating. Participants may $2 to enter their tasty literary treats, while festival-goers who want to sample the goods pay $5.

But before you think of illustrating Tom Wolfe's "The Bonfire of the Vanities," hold your fire. No open flames are allowed.

"We don't want anyone to do any sort of cherries jubilee," Durio said.

Festival-goers will vote for the best-looking edible book before the favorite part -- digging into the entries to choose the most delicious one.

Durio said edible book festivals, which occur annually on or near April Fool's Day, is held around the world with the goal of drawing more people into libraries. She added that by sponsoring the festival, UNT hopes to raise awareness of its Rare Book Room, which includes historic children's pop-up books and the complete works of Shakespeare in miniature.

UNT News Service Phone Number: (940) 565-2108

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