“Fabulation,” presented Oct. 12-15 by University of North Texas, explores woman’s return to her family

The University of North Texas’ Department of Dance and Theatre will present the
The University of North Texas’ Department of Dance and Theatre will present the play “Fabulation” Oct. 12-14 (Thursday-Saturday) and Oct. 14-15 (Saturday-Sunday) at the Studio Theater, Radio Television Film and Performing Arts Building. The play features, from left to right, Alexis Frias as Rosa; Jenna Davis-Jones as Undine; and Jada Spruill as Devora.
The University of North Texas’ Department of Dance and Theatre will present the
The University of North Texas’ Department of Dance and Theatre will present the play “Fabulation” Oct. 12-14 (Thursday-Saturday) and Oct. 14-15 (Saturday-Sunday) at the Studio Theater, Radio Television Film and Performing Arts Building. The play features, from left to right, Jada Spruill as Devora; Jenna Davis-Jones as Undine; and Alexis Frias as Rosa.
Wednesday, September 27, 2017 - 14:13

What: “Fabulation,” a play presented by the University of North TexasDepartment of Dance and Theatre, about a woman who returns to her family’s home in Brooklyn after a 14-year absence. The play was written by Pulitzer Prize winner Lynn Nottage and directed by vickie washington.

When: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 12-14 (Thursday-Saturday) and 2 p.m. Oct. 14-15 (Saturday-Sunday)

Where: Studio Theater, Radio Television Film and Performing Arts Building, 1179 Union Circle, Denton, Texas.

Cost: Tickets cost $7.50 for students, UNT faculty/staff and senior citizens and $10 for adults. Group rates are available. Audience members can purchase tickets at the box office, which is open from 1 to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday and one hour before each performance at the Radio Television Film and Performing Arts Building. For more information, call 940-565-2428, email dat-boxoffice@unt.edu or visit the Department of Dance and Theatre online.

More information: Visit UNT’s transportation services website to learn more about parking, including new rules. Patrons have two options for parking:
1.) ADA/handicapped patrons may park directly east of the Radio, Television, Film and Performing Arts Building (RTFP) in Lot 50 in the designated spaces.
2.) Patrons may pay to park through the app ParkMobile in the Union Circle Parking Garage.

Media: Download images from the play here and here.

 

DENTON (UNT), Texas ¾ The play “Fabulation” begins with its main character experiencing a panic attack. And it’s a roller coaster from there.

The University of North TexasDepartment of Dance and Theatre will present the play at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 12-14 (Thursday-Saturday) and 2 p.m. Oct. 14-15 (Saturday-Sunday) at the Studio Theater, Radio Television Film and Performing Arts Building. The play was written by Pulitzer Prize winner Lynn Nottage and directed by vickie washington.

Undine Barnes Calles grew up in a poor area of Brooklyn and, after graduation, swore off her life as she went to Dartmouth and began a successful career. But her husband has been caught embezzling money and she is now bankrupt. Pregnant and with nowhere to go, she has to go back home and face her family and other situations – hence, the panic attack.

“It’s a very beautiful play because a lot of people can relate to it, including myself,” said Jenna Davis-Jones, a senior theater major who grew up in a poor area and frequently moved around during her childhood. “I think this play reflects the culture and the times.”

Undine is used to getting her own way, and she’s thrown off by several situations, such as when a social services worker is rude to her.

But it’s not just Undine who goes through a lot.

“Every person in the show has some sort of fabulation, some sort of mask we put on ourselves,” Davis-Jones said.

Flow, her brother, is a military veteran now working as a security guard – and a bit resentful about his situation.

“He’s really trying to find a way to escape a trap that’s been placed on him by society,” said Tyrek Brown, a junior theater major. “I like that the fact that this character is real. He says things that people don’t say.”

Brown says the play offers a good lesson for audience members about exploring their roots and not forgetting where they came from.

Davis-Jones added that the play can be intense, but it’s fun, too.

“The best part of the show is it’s a dark comedy,” she said. “There’s still so many beautiful moments. You will find yourself laughing during it because the situation is so crazy you can’t help but laugh. The audience will go on a roller coaster ride while going through it.” 

UNT News Service Phone Number: (940) 565-2108